Review: Underwater (2020)

For all the lackluster films that have come and gone with little fanfare, there is occasionally a diamond in the rough. Even if it didn’t gain much notoriety during its run in theaters, there was one movie that swam its way into a suspenseful and surprisingly enjoyable foothold in the horror genre: Underwater, starring Kristen Stewart and the big bad Cthulhu himself. The film breathes a welcoming originality into the mysterious enemies that slowly pick off the cast one by one…

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Review: The Invisible Man

The Invisible Man follows Cecilia, played by the incredible Elisabeth Moss, after her escape from the house of her abusive tech mogul boyfriend. But even after his apparent suicide, she still encounters a force haunting her life, which she believes to be her boyfriend who’s found a way to become invisible. After her far-fetched theory leaves her discredited and abandoned, it’s up to her to protect herself and her loved ones, discover the truth, and get vengeance…

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The Last Dance: One of 2020’s Best Releases

This miniseries is one of the best I have ever watched. It doesn’t matter if you know every part of NBA history or nothing at all, because this show will guide you through it all. From the clips of Jordan’s best plays on the court to the backstage drama taking place away from the public, this show will give you a whole new perspective of Michael Jordan and the Bulls…

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In This Month: Spike Lee’s First Feature Film “She’s Gotta Have It” Premieres

On August 8th,1986, the Academy Award-winning director, Spike Lee, debuted his first feature-length film, “She’s Gotta Have It.” This film celebrated the world of American independent cinema and was revolutionary regarding its representation of African American men and women in Hollywood…

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In This Month: Serving Up Summer Scares

Ah, August. The peak of summer, where the sun shines hot and bright in the sky, beaches are packed, and theaters are packed with blockbuster hits full of action and adventure. It’s not a typical time when you’d expect to see a horror movie debut, but in 2019 summer served up some surprisingly potent scares with Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark. Based on the horror anthology series of the same name, which became infamous for illustrator Stephen Gammell’s disturbing artwork, the film was helmed by André Øvredal and Guillermo del Toro to bring several of the more insidious tales and creatures to life…

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Changes in the Film Industry During Quarantine

With entertainment being such a prominent aspect of our society, it’s crucial that people have movies and TV shows to look forward to. While it’s difficult to decide how to implement safety protocol, it should be a priority to enforce daily testing or spread out filming and give everyone certain work hours. Which leads us right back to one of the biggest problems, time…

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The Pandemic’s Effect On Cinema and Production

In addition to a halt in box office sales, film production has also slowed the past few months. I believe this is the ideal opportunity for the industry to blossom creatively, for quality films to flourish in accordance with smaller budgets, sets, and casts. There is something raw and beautiful about less precision and professionalism, which Hollywood tends to rely on. New voices and creators within the independent film industry may thrive, working around the struggles a pandemic provides. This time around, creativity and flexibility win over professionalism…

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Art Films 101: “Ida”

If you’re looking for a film that surpasses mere entertainment, Ida by Pawel Pawlikowski may be an eye-opener. The 2013 Polish film, with its poignant story and stunning cinematography, ignited my love and appreciation for art films. “Ida” explores existentialism, family, and the secular world versus religion through Ida Lebenstein, a Catholic-raised girl who learns of her Jewish background after meeting her only living relative, Wanda Gruz.

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Review: “Come and See”

“Come and See” is a 1985 film from the Soviet Union by director Elem Klimov. The film is set in Byelorussia in 1943, and follows a young boy, Florya, as he is recruited into the struggling resistance movement against the crushing arm of Nazi Germany. He enters the war with confidence and courage, as many young recruits do, but his mind and body are soon ravaged by the horrors of war.

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